When three scientists walk into a primary school…

Last week I had another volunteer session as a STEM Ambassador with a local primary school. I was one of three STEM Ambassadors (as well as the lovely STEM coordinator Catherine Brophy) who spoke for an hour with a variety of Key Stage 2 children (anywhere from around 7-10 years old I think) about being a scientist. They interviewed all four of us about what it means to be a scientist, why it is fun/important, and more. When I wanted to speak a bit more about what it means to “do biology with a computer”, I referred occasionally to these slides I had made for a similar purpose a few years back:

The slides are full of pretty pictures (the notes to accompany these slides are also available on my blog) and they gave me a way to focus the children’s attention. However, the kids last week really didn’t need much focusing, and asked lots of great questions. They asked if I had invented anything (does inventing biological data standards count? I think so…!), who my inspirations were (my high school Biology teacher of course, among others), if I had any pets (slightly off topic!), and what my greatest accomplishment was (my thesis – phew!). They all seemed really animated, which is one of the best perks of going to a primary rather than a secondary school. I love the fact that secondary school students can handle more complex discussions, but the enthusiasm of primary school kids is just stupendous.

This trip to a primary school was very timely, as I had recently been to a parents’ meeting at my own son’s primary school about the change in the English school system away from levels. The head teacher was fantastic at explaining the changes, but one of the things I noticed about the new system was a seeming lack of guidance for schools in the science curriculum. It worries me that primary schools are being edged away from teaching science due to a large emphasis on English and Mathematics.

However, this is an issue that the STEM network can help solve. As ambassadors, we can come into your school and talk about science, how we became scientists, and why we love it. Last week it was three scientists talking, but the STEM network can provide experiments and other visual aids too, as well as helping schools enter science contests and fairs such as the Big Bang.

We had fun last week. We had a chemist (with a background in maths) who brought props: a cow bone, jelly babies, hair dye and other things. She asked the kids what the cow bone and jelly babies had in common (gelatin!), and quite a few of them knew. The other biologist had done field work with butterflies, and had the children imagine how you could mark or safely trap them. I talked about the structure of DNA (one child knew the comparison with a spiral staircase!), and how science was great because you don’t have to accept what anyone says “just because”. You don’t believe them? Test it! Science is imagination, testing, and reproducibility.

You don’t have to take my word for it “just because” I say it’s great – become a STEM Ambassador yourself, and test my statement that it is a completely awesome thing to do 🙂

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