Archive for the ‘Outreach’ Category

When three scientists walk into a primary school…

March 10, 2015 Leave a comment

Last week I had another volunteer session as a STEM Ambassador with a local primary school. I was one of three STEM Ambassadors (as well as the lovely STEM coordinator Catherine Brophy) who spoke for an hour with a variety of Key Stage 2 children (anywhere from around 7-10 years old I think) about being a scientist. They interviewed all four of us about what it means to be a scientist, why it is fun/important, and more. When I wanted to speak a bit more about what it means to “do biology with a computer”, I referred occasionally to these slides I had made for a similar purpose a few years back:

The slides are full of pretty pictures (the notes to accompany these slides are also available on my blog) and they gave me a way to focus the children’s attention. However, the kids last week really didn’t need much focusing, and asked lots of great questions. They asked if I had invented anything (does inventing biological data standards count? I think so…!), who my inspirations were (my high school Biology teacher of course, among others), if I had any pets (slightly off topic!), and what my greatest accomplishment was (my thesis – phew!). They all seemed really animated, which is one of the best perks of going to a primary rather than a secondary school. I love the fact that secondary school students can handle more complex discussions, but the enthusiasm of primary school kids is just stupendous.

This trip to a primary school was very timely, as I had recently been to a parents’ meeting at my own son’s primary school about the change in the English school system away from levels. The head teacher was fantastic at explaining the changes, but one of the things I noticed about the new system was a seeming lack of guidance for schools in the science curriculum. It worries me that primary schools are being edged away from teaching science due to a large emphasis on English and Mathematics.

However, this is an issue that the STEM network can help solve. As ambassadors, we can come into your school and talk about science, how we became scientists, and why we love it. Last week it was three scientists talking, but the STEM network can provide experiments and other visual aids too, as well as helping schools enter science contests and fairs such as the Big Bang.

We had fun last week. We had a chemist (with a background in maths) who brought props: a cow bone, jelly babies, hair dye and other things. She asked the kids what the cow bone and jelly babies had in common (gelatin!), and quite a few of them knew. The other biologist had done field work with butterflies, and had the children imagine how you could mark or safely trap them. I talked about the structure of DNA (one child knew the comparison with a spiral staircase!), and how science was great because you don’t have to accept what anyone says “just because”. You don’t believe them? Test it! Science is imagination, testing, and reproducibility.

You don’t have to take my word for it “just because” I say it’s great – become a STEM Ambassador yourself, and test my statement that it is a completely awesome thing to do :)

How can socks facilitate scientific outreach?

July 4, 2011 Leave a comment

OK, it seems odd, at least on the surface. How can socks help science generally, and science outreach specifically? I asked myself the same question a few months ago when I found an email lurking in my inbox, hidden since just before my maternity leave started. It seems a sock company called Sock It To Me socks featured a different Cool Girl each month, and they wished to feature me. I had a lot of questions. Was this for real? Was it an appropriate platform to be talking about myself, and about what I do? Would it seem as if I was trading my online work persona for socks?

Well, the other Cool Girls’ profiles seemed eclectic and interesting: dancers, astrophysicists, mathematicians and many others. So, not bad company to be in, and it was a genuine request. And, before you ask, I will be getting two pairs of socks for my efforts – ah, temptation. But ultimately, I need to take care of my work/public online persona, and I had to decide whether this was a good addition. But then I realized I could talk about ontologies to people who may have never even heard of bioinformatics and, for me, that was too exciting an opportunity to miss. True, it was limited to 600 words, and a writer used the information I gave her to write the final piece, but I think it was all worth it. She did a great job, and within the confines of the article format, I’m happy about how my field of research is portrayed. I really feel strongly about science outreach, and I do think that novel methods of information dissemination shouldn’t necessarily be ruled out.

So, here it is: Ms Cool Girl of the Month, July 2011. What do you think? Did I benefit science or just myself (well, maybe not just myself – I namechecked my high school biology teacher, and mentioned Cameron too)?

Inspiring Science Autumn Newsletter

December 7, 2009 Leave a comment

I’ve been meaning to link to this Autumn’s Inspiring Science newsletter, put out by Claire Willis and others at the Science Learning Centre North-East. Not only does it have interesting articles on the science outreach they’ve been involved with recently and what’s coming up in the near future, but it also has a short article on me and my partnered teacher, Louise, as part of the Teacher Scientist Network. Find more about the programme on the Inspiring Science website. Enjoy!

Inspiring Science Autumn Newsletter

October 12, 2009 Leave a comment

I recently attended an open day at the Science Learning Centre North-East (SLCNE) in my role as half of a Teacher Scientist Network (TSN) partnership. There Louise, my partnered teacher, and I gave a short presentation on how the TSN works, and more specifically about our efforts last year. I enjoyed talking about what a positive experience it was, and also enjoyed seeing the other initiatives (such as Science in the Spotlight and Scientists@Work) that the SLCNE manages.

As an extra bonus, the newsletter for this Centre for Autumn had an article on my TSN partnership with Louise (hence the categorization of this post into the “Self Reference” section). Not only can you read the interview with me and Louise, but you can also read about:

  • ‘Liquid Science’ in March 2010 at Newcastle’s Liquid and Diva Nightclub
  • How you can get funding from the Royal Society (up to £3000!) for “teachers and scientists or engineers to work together on creative investigations involving 5–16 year olds”. The funding goes straight to the school, and the closing date is November 6th. More information:
  • Details on the 2009 SLCNE Christmas Lecture from Dr. Laura Grant. She’ll be giving a ‘Cool Science’ presentation “which looks at some of the strange things that happen at low temperatures. The lectures will be performed at four venues across the North East during the first week of December and are suitable for Year 6/7 pupils.” More information:

I strongly encourage you all to join in with your local SLC or branch of TSN, and to have a look at this season’s newsletter!

The Great North Museum: encouraging collaboration, teaching and outreach

June 7, 2009 Leave a comment

Share photos on twitter with Twitpic

This week I attended a great two-hour session run by the brand-spanking new Great North Museum (GNM) designed to encourage collaboration between Newcastle University researchers and the GNM. In addition, ideas for using this type of collaboration in the form of outreach to the community (e.g. schoolkids) was welcome. There have already been some useful research collaborations between the university and the museum, and they want to encourage even more.

The GNM was formed from a number of museums (e.g. the Hancock, and the Hatton Gallery) and under the auspices of many different groups including Newcastle University (a full list is available). It opened its doors last week, over the school holidays. I work in the university building that sits just across the street from the GNM: Hancock building, and every time I looked there was a queue stretching down to the road. You can see an example of this on Simon’s Twitpic (pictured above). It has received more than 67,000 visitors in its first week. Congratulations! I have to say that the museum is really impressive from the outside, and looks great on the inside. I haven’t given myself the full tour yet, but I will be doing so soon.

While at the event today, I learned some interesting things about the contents of the GNM, and I thought it might be of general interest. The GNM has over 500,000 items in its collection, of which there is only space for 3,500 to be displayed, even with the revamp of the museums. They have a taxidermist on-site, as they still get roadkill and the occasional other type of animal to prepare for the collection.

Their collection covers a wide array of natural history and archaeology, and includes:

  • birds and bird eggs, including a Great Auk egg
  • an extensive collection of molluscs, including 1000s of type specimens
  • sea slug specimens and figures
  • insects, most of which are stored in their original victorian cabinets
  • an osteology collection which includes moa, great hawks and dodos
  • game heads
  • botany specimens and drawings, including an extensive herbarium with lichens and north-eastern seaweed
  • paleozoology, including a carboniferous tetrapod (crocodile-like amphibian), with predominately local geology with lots of type material, some of which is on display – recent improvements in display cases’ environments now allow this
  • paleobotany including a big fossilized tree trunk, a bunch of specimens from the 1830s and 100s of thin sections of fossils
  • minerals
  • ethnography material, including some original items from Captain Cook
  • Egyptology
  • extensive Roman archaelogy from Hadrian’s Wall
  • prehistoric archaeology
  • Anglo-saxon and medieval collections
  • Greek and Etruscan art and archaeology
  • fine art in the Hatton collections and original Bewick prints and blocks
  • a large archive which includes letters from people like Mary Anning, Richard Owen and Charles Darwin

The oldest item in the archaeology collection is a 11,000-year-old paleolithic flint blade found in the region. There is also a prehistoric gallery at the GNM, and the Hadrian’s Wall gallery is the largest at the GNM. The museum also houses the Shefton collection of about 1,000 Greek and Etruscan items.

In terms of collaboration and outreach, a couple of points came across clearly amongst the case studies and discussions:

  1. The museum can be used to teach biodiversity and conservationism
  2. Using the items in the museum, re-creations of important research can be done (and are being done). For instance, it was museum collections of bird eggs that helped researchers figure out that eggshells were thinning due to DDT ingestion by birds
  3. Collaboration between researchers at the university and the museum can lead to truly interesting work being done. Showcasing university research in the museum, engaging with schools and the wider community, and performing research with the help of the museum are the sorts of things that were discussed.

I like having a museum on my (work) doorstep, and hope to find some way to work with it. Enjoy your visit!


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